weekend-warrior-injury

Hello, Weekend Warrior

By | Prevention | No Comments

How to avoid weekend warrior injuries.

So many people have schedules filled to the brim with full-time work, family duties, household responsibilities, and other commitments, so squeezing in regular recreational activities can be a real challenge. Many of us have become weekend warriors, managing to carve out some time to recreate on Saturdays and Sundays. As a result, we tend to push our activities to the limit in hopes of making the best of them. The problem is the remaining five days a week we spend sitting at a desk or in a car commuting back and forth to work or our kids’ activities. Despite this imbalanced schedule,  we still expect our bodies to work in the same way they did when we were younger. Unfortunately, this type of schedule can increase our risk of injury.

There are a few things that you can do every day that can help to minimize your injury risk and help prepare your body and its tissues to better manage the occasional sport-related stress you place on it.

1. Warm up right.

When it comes to warming up our bodies before activity, it seems the older we get the lazier or more complacent we become. For example, we might get to the rink strap on the pads and jump into a game and expect our bodies to hold up. Or we decide to go for a run and start at race pace and wonder why our feet or knees hurt after the first kilometre.

There are many benefits to a proper warm-up that can help our body prepare to the needed workload.

These include:

  • Improving blood flow to working muscles, which allows them to be more pliable and accepting for stretch or loading.
  • Gradually increasing the heart rate and blood pressure, minimizing the chance of getting a rapid spike.
  • Improving oxygen and nutrient transport to the muscles and joints.
  • Improving neuromuscular efficiency and coordination.
  • Mentally preparing you for the upcoming task and increasing your focus.

A good warm-up should consist of a minimum of 10-15 minutes of dynamic movements involving the muscles you will be using for the upcoming activity.A good resource to use is the FIFA11+ warm-up routine, which has strong support for injury prevention behind its program. If you’re unsure about which movements should be included, speak with a healthcare practitioner, kinesiologist, or personal trainer—like our experts at Active Sport Physiotherapy Clinic—to help design something specifically for you. 

2. Maintain a regular stretching and mobility routine at home.

Stretching doesn’t have long, drawn-out process. It can be as simple as five to 10 minutes each morning to get your body prepared to move for the day. Target major muscle groups and movement patterns that you will be using during the day, as well as muscle groups that may get neglected given your work environment. For example, those of us who spend the majority of the day in a seated position should look to stretch the hip flexors and lumbar spine to keep them from shortening over time.

3. Cool down.

It’s important to cool your body down after you’ve engaged in an activity. This doesn’t mean cool off the body with a cold adult beverage after the game (though that does sound good, doesn’t it?). Take the time after a workout to gently stretch the major muscles you used during your workout or activity.

A cool down period helps to:

  • Prevent blood pooling in the extremities.
  • Promote clearance of lactic acid from the muscles.
  • Restore your regular heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing rate.

4. Stay on the move.

It’s important you take the time to get up and move throughout your day. Recommended guidelines suggest that you should stand up at least once per hour if working in a seated position. This can be as simple as getting up for a drink of water or going to the bathroom. But remember, the more you move, the better your body will feel. Having regular bouts of activity throughout your day will help keep your muscles from adapting a shortened position and improve circulation into your lower extremity.

So there you have it, weekend warrior. You may not have the chance to engage in high-energy activity throughout the week but by staying active and healthy, taking the proper precautions to keep your body prepared to handle the stresses you place on it on the weekend, you’ll minimize the risk of injury. If you have any questions about what you can do to prevent injuries, reach out to us by email here or give us a call at 613-936-0676. We’re happy to help!

Concussions: Hard Hitting Truths About Recovery

By | Homepage, Physiotherapy, Treatment | No Comments

What’s the best way to recover from a concussion?

No doubt you’ve heard lots about concussions in the news. Perhaps you’re already aware that hits to the head could result in concussions and the symptoms that accompany them:  headache, pressure in the head, neck pain, nausea or vomiting, dizziness, blurred vision, balance issues, visual disturbance, sensitivity to light, memory loss, concentration issues, confusion, depression, emotional changes and sleeping disorder. That’s the short list. There are many other symptoms, too many to name.

The way concussions are managed has changed greatly in the past five years,  especially in the past year.  Concussion management has become a multidisciplinary approach that addresses more than headaches and difficulties related to concentrating.  

Concussion care is a multidisciplinary venture involving child, parent, coach, teacher, physiotherapist, physician, nurse practitioner and optometrist.  When needed, neurologist, ENT specialist, psychologist, neuropsychologist and other medical specialist may be called in to help.

Recognize the signs

The first thing to do is to recognize the signs and remove the person from playing whatever sport they are engaged in. Continuing to play could aggravate the condition and has been shown to double the recovery time. For parents, coaches and trainers, there is a Concussion Recognition Tool (for use with adults and children) that can be downloaded hereIt’s a good idea to carry a printout in your first aid kit!

 

Seek out a professional assessment

If you’re the person who has suffered the concussion, it’s important to have the get a full assessment from a physician, physiotherapist or nurse practitioner trained in concussion assessment to acquire a post-injury baseline and to monitor changes over the following weeks.  Typically, they’ll use the SCAT 5 (Sport Concussion Assessment Tool – 5th Edition), developed by world leaders and researchers in the field. It’s important to note that SCAT 5 is endorsed by the Canadian medical community, the International Olympic Committee and several international sport federations.

 

Have a rest period

It is important to have 48 hours of rest following the injury. This is very important.  (Note: Sometimes the concussion signs can be delayed and a longer rest period is needed.)  Following this rest period, if appropriate, your medical practitioner may decide on a return to light activities—walking, occasional text or email, occasional reading can be introduced during a trial period.

Children affected with concussion need to be assessed differently – they are not simply smaller adults.  It is important to prioritize a symptom-free return to school before a symptom-free return to sports/activities.

 

Progress to light activities, cardio and tasks

If symptom-free, your medical practitioner will help you progress gradually in intensity. First attempt light activities and light cardio, then move on to sport-specific light tasks.  Make sure you work with a health professional trained in concussion management to monitor you for headaches and other symptoms of concussion, balance, endurance, visual disturbances, concentration, processing and memory.

 

Be patient

At times, symptoms are persistent despite your best effort to rest and resume normal daily activities. Things don’t always progress quickly or at least as quickly as you’d like. A trained medical personnel needs to establish if the persistence of symptoms is due to neck troubles, vestibular dysfunctions (inner ear) or if you require Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (for depression, mood or behaviour issues).

 

Understand what physiotherapy will do for you

When you first visit your physiotherapist, they’ll inventory your symptoms and how they affect you.  As the neck can be a contributor to headaches and dizziness, they’ll assess the impact of its dysfunctions on your symptoms.  

They’ll follow that up with a series of balance tests to identify the source of the lack of balance and/or dizziness.  Remember that your physiotherapist’s role is to treat neck dysfunctions and labyrinth (inner ear)/balance problems. If they detect dysfunctions outside their spectrum of care, they’ll be sure to refer you to another specialist.

If they do identify neck or balance problems, or general conditioning issues, they’ll engage in a series of interventions to address these.

 

Don’t do it alone

Recovering from a concussion can be overwhelming and the symptoms can affect physical and mental health. Your progress need to be monitored objectively and medically.  Assessment and follow-up with your physician/nurse practitioner is essential. Working with a sport physiotherapist trained in concussion management, (like those at Active Sport Physiotherapy Clinic), is an important part of getting you back on your feet quickly.

 

Get trained

If you are a coach, athletic therapist, trainer, first aider or parent, you might be interested in booking a  FREE Concussion Recognition and Management Clinic. Please reach out to learn more.  It’s part of our community service program!

Physiotherapy For the People

By | Homepage, Physiotherapy

Why physiotherapy is beneficial for everyone, not just athletes.

We’ve all experienced muscle or joint pain after exercising or following a hard day’s work. But when these pains extend one or two days past the workout and limit normal everyday movements, you’ll need to see a physiotherapist.

 

What happens when you injure yourself

During exercise, your muscles, joint and tendons warm up and fill with blood—a process that provides nutrients and oxygen, and releases lactic acid and CO2. This process allows the body to optimize body tissue repair and maintenance.

When you engage in a light level of activity, your body repairs itself automatically and adapts to new works loads. Your body’s structure become more efficient and geared towards performance.  It’s a process called overload exercise principle.

But…things can go wrong. In your attempt to work harder or exercise beyond what you’re used to, muscle tissue and joints can breakdown. When you take things too far, your body’s structure become red, swollen and painful on the inside, and are subject to small micro-ruptures. This results in overuse injuries.

So, it doesn’t matter if you’re a worker or an athlete. Injuries happen. Physiotherapy is there to help repair the damage. Your physiotherapist—like the friendly physiotherapists at Active Sport Physiotherapy Clinic—can help you identify the affected structure and mechanism of injury, analyze the faulty biomechanics (movements) to correct and prevent re-injury, and set you up with a stretching and strengthening program. Their goal is to help you recover and return to your regular activities.

 

What happens when you don’t listen to your body

When you have repetitive irritations, inflammation can become chronic.  What could have healed in a period of two to six weeks may linger for three to six months.  This  happens when a simple inflammation—a mix of redness, heat, pain and tissue irritation—that would normally heal in a few day/weeks changes in chemistry resulting in vulnerable tissue. In other words, when you don’t listen to your body, you can injure yourself more easily!

 

The four-step solution

There are ways to avoid injury in the first place.

  1. Identify the aggravating factors and minimize them.

This sounds easy but can be complicated, especially when those aggravating factors come from tasks we need to complete for work, or for everyday living like walking, holding, carrying, lifting and so on. A physiotherapist can help you make ergonomic choices to avoid motions that irritate your body.

  1. Support the structure.

When it makes sense, you can use a brace for a wrist injury, tendonitis, carpal tunnel, shin splints, chronic ankle sprain or any other overuse injuries. These supports will help you reach a speedy recovery. (As an aside our Bracing Corner has all the bracing you might need.)

  1. Stretch the affected structures.

When inflamed, a tendon or muscle shortens as it heals (similar to how a skin scar pulls inward). You need to heal these in an elongated position to avoid constant re-tearing and re-irritation of the injury. You do this by stretching!

  1. Strengthen to prevent recurrence.

Once lengthened, your tissues are less vulnerable to movement and are ready to get strong again. By strengthening it over several weeks to months, you will gradually reverse the process of chronic inflammation and allow the tissue to receive load once more.

 

Why should you see a physiotherapist?

A physiotherapist is a specialist in movement, function and body mechanics, trained in various sub-specialties including orthopedics, sports, ergonomics, occupational injuries, neurology, and cardiovascular conditions.  These are the experts who know how to identify and treat problems using the most effective modalities, who can set up and support you through programs, and can also help you avoid future injuries. They’re trained to help everyone—from the everyday worker to the amateur athlete to the high-performance professional.